Police representatives from all 32 competing countries will collect to share intelligence and spot troublemakers in World Cup crowds

Police representatives from all 32 competing countries will collect to share intelligence and spot troublemakers in World Cup crowds Domodedovo (Russia): Police from 33 countries are collecting under one roof for the World Cup as Russia arranges to manage with strong problems ranging from hooliganism and terrorism to backlash against local laws. The police representatives from all 32 competing countries will collect in a police academy on the edge of the forest outside Moscow to share intelligence and spot troublemakers in World Cup crowds.

At the centre, opened Tuesday by Russian Interior Minister Vladimir Kolokoltsev, they will walk up a red carpet to the entrance, past a table football game and a great plastic model of World Cup mascot Zabivaka the wolf, before sitting at desks organized by every team’s World Cup group. Kolokoltsev stated, “Our task is to respond quickly, correctly and according to the law” when trouble occurs.” The top British officer working at the tournament, Chief Inspector Joseph Stokoe, takes part beyond diplomatic tension. Britain has blamed Russia of utilizing a nerve agent in the strived assassination of former spy Sergei Skripal in the English city of Salisbury in March, which Moscow refuses.

Stokoe mentions that the target is to “take politics out of policing.” Hooliganism has been a problem at last tournaments, and British police are believing to assist make sure exuberant fans are not mistaken for hooligans following collisions between Russia and England supporters in France at the 2016 European Championship. He stated, “I know how excitable and how much English fans can enjoy the occasion, drinking and singing, waving the flags.” He also mentioned, “I know I need to try and explain to my Russian colleagues that isn’t a precursor to anything more than England fans enjoying themselves when they go to the match.”

Hooliganism is also a worry for Polish police captain Wojciech Dobrowolski after fights between Polish and Russian supporters at the 2012 European Championship in Warsaw. Russian police representatives at the opening of the centre denied to take questions about their security plan. Local authorities have pointed to a blacklist of 451 fans restricted from sports events by court order, though that number is lower than for similar programmes in many other European countries. People with knowledge of Russia’s hard-core fan scene have journalists that as many as several thousand Russians have been denied a government-issue Fan ID, making their World Cup tickets invalid.

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